What is a Music Agent?

In the strict definition of the word, an agent is a person who is responsible for booking shows for bands. Agents approach promoters about shows, negotiate contracts for live performances and basically make sure the wheels of a concert tour, or even a single show, turn smoothly. An agent will work with the promoter to make sure that everything a band needs will be at the venue, that there is an appropriate soundcheck period set aside for the band, and of course, what the payment will be for the performance and if the accommodation will be provided by the promoter. Want only red M&Ms backstage? Your agent is the one who will make sure the promoter knows.

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Concert Promoters and Music Touring Budget: Who Pays?

When you’re booking a gig, what costs should you expect the promoter to cover and which ones should you expect to have to pay for yourself? There is no real simple answer to that question. The cost of putting on a show can be enormous, and depending on how much money your gig is expected to generate, a promoter may want to try and share some of the financial risk with you. It isn’t necessarily unreasonable in all instances, but we’ll get into that.

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What’s the Role of a Concert Promoter?

Wikipedia say: Tour promoters (also known as concert promoters or talent buyers) are the individuals or companies responsible for organizing a live concert tour or special event performance. But I prefer to divide this in 3 different fields: Tour Promoters (In charge of a tour of a band/artist), Talent Buyers (basically work for clubs or venues) and Concert Promoters. This opportunity we will talk about Concert Promoter, which is someone who publicizes and promotes/produce live events, such as massive concerts (Arenas, Stadiums), Live House (small venues, theatres, etc..) and music festivals. They organize gigs, book bands/artists, produce the show (technical production) and advertise the shows to bring in paying attendees and profits. In another article we will talk about Tour Promoters or talent Buyers.

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Being a Concert Promoter

The main job of a concert promoter, usually simply called a promoter or music promoter, is to publicize a concert. Promoters are the people in charge of “putting on” the show. They work with agents, or in some cases, directly with the bands, and with clubs and concert venues to arrange for a show to take place. Promoters then are in charge of making sure the word gets out about that show. They also take care of arranging the incidentals, like hotels and backline for the band. In a nutshell, it is the promoter’s job to make sure things go off without a hitch. Note that this kind of promoter is different from a radio plugger or PR agent.

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An unlikely industry has found a ‘genius’ way to advertise to millennials

Walk through any major music festival and you’re going to encounter similar fixtures: big stages, a mix of hip up-and-comers and established megastars, and an array of gourmet food and drink vendors. Add one more to the list: brands.

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The 10 Best Brand Activations at Music Festivals

Brand activations at music festivals are a great way for your sponsors to build a genuine connection with your audience. In fact, studies have shown that millennial fans perceive brands as more authentic and trustworthy when they sponsor a music festival, and are more likely to purchase and recommend a product.

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The Average Income of Concert Promoters

Concert promoters are the primary organizers of a show or festival. Promoters often invest in their own shows, increasing their potential income. Because it is the promoter’s job to make sure that every cost for the show is accounted for and that everyone involved — from the venue staff to the music artist — gets paid, the promoter often gets paid last, after all other costs have been paid. The amount of money that is left for the promoter, though, can be substantial. The many concerts people see and enjoy, especially in the summer, are organized, scheduled and advertised by concert promoters. They decide which musical groups will attract the largest crowds, book them and promote the events through ads, press releases, social media and the Internet. Some work for concert halls or parks, while others are self-employed. Either way, these professionals usually earn above-average incomes.

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Why Concert Promoters Matter

In the third of our series on the theories that underpin our research into live music, Matt Brennan and Emma Webster attempt to define the promoter and how they operate, in an extract from ‘Why Concert Promoters Matter’, originally published in Scottish Music Review in 2011. The authors analyse existing accounts of live music promoters and offer their own analysis of what a promoter is and does, concluding that promoters may use one or more of three basic models of promotion within rock and pop: ‘independent’, ‘artist-affiliated’, and ‘venue’.

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How To Build An Event SLA For Marketing And Sales

Marketing and Sales don’t have a great history of agreeing on things, but alignment between the two teams is critical for event success. Service-level Agreements (SLAs) are an effective way to outline agreed-upon goals and expectations between two teams. Since in-person events require a lot from both Sales and Marketing, it’s necessary to have an event-specific SLA.

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Top 5 Best Practices for Exhibitors

Trade shows are great opportunities to track prospective business and for companies to vet their competition. While it costs thousands for exhibitors to bring an entire team to the floor, there’s a reason these costs aren’t keeping marketers at bay: Trade-show marketing as a tactic has shown resilience.

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